Categories
Health

New Health and Care Video Library

A new resource to make it easier for patients to access trusted health information and guidance remotely.

As part of their COVID-19 response, Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group would like to offer free access for NHS staff and patients to an online Health and Care Video Library of over 600 simple and easy to follow information videos. 

The clinically assured content has been produced in partnership with Torbay and South Devon NHS Foundation Trust and covers a range of topics and conditions in an easily accessible format, providing an alternative to written health information.

Example topics include:

  • Diabetes
  • Healthy Living and Diet
  • Maternity
  • Inhaler Use and Breathing Problems

The videos have already been used by many other GP practices, CCGs and NHS Trusts across the UK and clinicians report to have seen the use of video improve patient experience, help patients feel more supported and also assist clinical staff in the delivery of remote services such as video consultations.

We are happy to share this resource with our patients and hope to use the content to enhance the support we provide and that you will find it helpful to access the simple and visual health information at any time.

You can access the library at  www.healthvideos.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk or search for ‘Health and Care Videos’ in your app store to download the app version (available on Android and iOS).



Content provided by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). For more information, please visit www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Published on Fri, 05 Mar 2021 11:50:42 GMT
Modified on Fri, 05 Mar 2021 11:50:42 GMT

Categories
Health

Domestic abuse support

Domestic abuse is a complex issue, which can take many forms including psychological, financial, sexual, emotional and physical.

This past year has been challenging for everyone, but for victims of domestic abuse who are suffering from continued cruelty and violence it will have felt and will continue to feel intolerable. Lockdown has meant that it’s easier for abusers to control and abuse their victims, who are probably feeling more isolated and alone than they would under normal circumstances.

Children are often the silent victims of domestic abuse, with no schools open they are also locked into situations with few opportunities to gain support. 

If you are suffering from domestic abuse then Merseyside Police, along with partner agencies, are still here to offer help and support. You are not alone. If home is not a safe place for you then you do not have to stay there and you can and should leave to seek help.  Charities are still working, helplines are live and refuges are available.

If you are in immediate danger, you should always call 999. If you ring 999 and are not in a safe position to speak to us then cough, or tap the phone and press 55, when prompted. This will alert the operator that you need assistance and we will provide support.

Alternatively, there is a new scheme called ‘Ask for Ani’ which offers an opportunity to reach out for help at pharmacies, including Boots, without making your situation obvious to other members of the public, or alerting your abuser. If you ‘Ask for Ani’ at pharmacy counters then you will be taken by a staff member to a private space where you can be put in touch with the police, support services and helplines.

Whether you are currently experiencing abuse, or have suffered abuse in the past, support is available. Domestic Abuse specialist services in your local area remain open and can offer you expert support and advice.  They will not tell you what to do but will provide options and choices to help you live safely and recover from abuse.  

For more information, help and guidance please visit:

www.VictimCareMerseyside.org where you can also access a directory of nearly 70 support organisations who are on hand to offer care and support.

Or call the freephone, 24-hour National Domestic Abuse Helpline:

0808 2000 247

www.nationaldahelpline.org.uk


Content provided by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). For more information, please visit www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Published on Fri, 26 Feb 2021 13:54:08 GMT
Modified on Fri, 26 Feb 2021 13:54:08 GMT

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Health

Carers in Liverpool to receive Covid-19 vaccine


The local NHS and Liverpool City Council are appealing to unpaid carers whose role currently isn’t recorded, to make themselves known so that they can have the Covid-19 vaccine.

Anyone in Liverpool already identified as a carer in their GP records – those who receive Carer’s Allowance – or those known to Liverpool City Council or Liverpool Carers Centre Local Solutions, will be automatically invited for a vaccination over the coming weeks and don’t need to take any further action.

However, some people could be at risk of missing out, because their carer status is unknown to services. 

Those currently eligible for a Covid-19 vaccine as a carer include anyone who is eligible for Carer’s Allowance, or who acts as the sole or primary carer of an elderly or disabled person who is at increased risk of COVID-19 mortality, including:

  • Children with severe neuro-disabilities (your GP will have already been in contact to invite your child for vaccination if they are included)
  • Those who are designated Clinically Extremely Vulnerable (advised to shield)
  • Adults who have underlying health conditions 
  • Those who need care because of advanced age

Anyone who thinks they might be eligible to receive a vaccine as a carer, but who doesn’t receive Carer’s Allowance or have their carer status recorded with any of the organisations mentioned above, should contact the Liverpool Carers Centre now. This includes carers aged 16–18, as well as adult carers.

They can do this either by calling: 07545652775, or by emailing: [email protected]. Alternatively, they can also complete an e-referral form by visiting: www.localsolutions.org.uk/carers-vaccine.

Liverpool Carers Centre is a Liverpool City Council-commissioned service, available to support with any enquiries from members of the public about their eligibility as a carer.

They will use a standard set of questions to advise individuals on whether they meet the government’s specific requirements to be identified as a carer, and therefore to receive the vaccine.

Following this assessment, if a person is identified as an unpaid carer they will be provided with national NHS Covid-19 Vaccination Booking Service details to arrange a vaccination.

In addition, the team will also be able to provide a range of further support and advice regular news and updates for carers, as well access to activities that support health and wellbeing or offer carers a break from their caring role.

For frequently asked questions (FAQs) about the Covid-19 vaccine, click here.

Content provided by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). For more information, please visit www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Published on Thu, 25 Feb 2021 10:35:54 GMT
Modified on Thu, 25 Feb 2021 10:35:54 GMT

Categories
Health

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Published on Sat, 20 Feb 2021 12:08:16 GMT
Modified on Sat, 20 Feb 2021 12:16:15 GMT

Categories
Health

New groups eligible for Covid-19 vaccine

The next phase of Covid-19 vaccination gets underway in Liverpool this week, with the following priority groups now eligible:

  • People aged 65 and over
  • People aged 16 to 64 with underlying health conditions
  • People in receipt of a carer’s allowance, or those who are the main carer of an elderly or disabled person whose welfare may be at risk if the carer falls ill

In the coming days, people aged 65 and over will receive a letter from the national NHS Covid-19 Vaccination Booking Service. They can use the link or phone number in this letter to book an appointment at a number of sites, including one of three Liverpool pharmacies, or the mass vaccination centre in St Helens.

Alternatively, if people aged 65 and over don’t wish to take up this option, they can also receive their vaccination at one of the 14 GP-led sites across Liverpool – people will be sent a text message or contacted by phone to let them know how to arrange this. They should not contact their own GP practice separately.

People aged 16-64 with underlying health conditions, and carers, will be contacted by their GP-led service (either by text message or phone) to invite them to make an appointment. They do not need to contact their own GP practice separately.

All vaccinations are by appointment only; no drop-in vaccinations are available and members of the public who arrive without a booking will not be vaccinated.

People over 70 and those who are clinically extremely vulnerable (shielding) were in the first four groups prioritised for vaccination. The majority of people in Liverpool within these groups have already received a first dose of the vaccine, however anyone who hasn’t should use the national booking system – or contact their GP practice – to arrange a vaccination as soon as possible.

The NHS is prioritising vaccinating those people who experts have agreed will benefit from it the most first, based on national guidelines from the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation (JCVI). The full guidance is available here.

The GP-led vaccination centres and regional vaccination centres are in addition to hospital hub sites, run by NHS trusts, which are currently focused on vaccinating the local health and social care workforce.

Content provided by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). For more information, please visit www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Published on Mon, 15 Feb 2021 09:36:43 GMT
Modified on Mon, 15 Feb 2021 09:47:15 GMT

Categories
Health

What sort of help is available?

Your sight loss may vary from day to day, and this may affect how much help you need or want.

The emotional impact of sight loss

It’s very common to experience a wide range of emotions when losing your sight. In this section we have put together some ideas that may help you.

View more

How an ECLO can help you

Your Eye Clinic at the hospital may have an Eye Clinic Liaison Officer (ECLO). They can provide you with information and advice on getting the help and support that you need.

View more

Getting out and about

The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association provides a service called ‘My Guide’, which helps if you’re feeling less confident about getting around.

View more

Who you can talk to

There are many organisations that provide free telephone counselling for different eye conditions.

View more

Talking to other people and finding out what’s in your local area

It may help to talk with friends, family or others around you who are willing to listen. It may also help to talk to people who have had similar experiences and understand what you’re going through.

View more

Low vision

The vast majority of people who are issued with a CVI (Certificate of Visual Impairment) will retain some sight.

View more

The emotional impact of sight loss

It’s very common to experience a wide range of emotions when losing your sight. In this section we have put together some ideas that may help you.

It’s common for people to experience feelings of shock, denial and despair when they lose their sight, but usually these are temporary and will lessen over time. It’s natural to feel down, but if you’re struggling, we would advise you to talk to your GP or another healthcare professional and to find out what help and support they can give you.

I lost sight in my right eye many years ago and have had over 10 operations on my left eye. I know that it’s hard at first – it was for me. There is help out there, and you’re not on your own. – Jenny

Your sight loss may vary from day to day, and this may affect how much help you need or want.

Content provided by RNIB.

We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:02:55 GMT
Modified on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 17:14:24 GMT

How an ECLO can help you

Your Eye Clinic at the hospital may have an Eye Clinic Liaison Officer (ECLO). They can provide you with information and advice on getting the help and support that you need.

Your Eye Clinic at the hospital may have an Eye Clinic Liaison Officer (ECLO). They can provide you with information and advice on getting the help and support that you need.

This includes assistance with understanding the certification and registration process, accessing emotional support and counselling, if necessary, and providing information on sight rehabilitation and other services in the community, such as referring to your local council and voluntary organisations.

If there are no ECLOs at your Eye Clinic, RNIB’s telephone-based Sight Loss Advisers are available on 0303 123 9999 and provide advice on anything about living with sight loss, including coping in the early stages, living independently, using technology, employment, legal rights, financial benefits and more.

Content provided by RNIB.

We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:06:27 GMT
Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:04:24 GMT

Getting out and about

The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association provides a service called ‘My Guide’, which helps if you’re feeling less confident about getting around.

The Guide Dogs for the Blind Association provides a service called ‘My Guide’, which helps if you’re feeling less confident about getting around.

The service trains volunteers to use sighted-guiding techniques to help you to get to the places you want to go to, with confidence and on your own terms. You may want to learn or re-learn familiar routes to get to the shops, or to maintain your fitness. Training can also be provided for your friends and family to learn simple and safe guiding techniques to help you. For more information, call 0800 953 0113, email [email protected] or visit www.guidedogs.org.uk

The Sight Advice FAQ answers questions about living with sight loss, eye health or being newly diagnosed with a sight condition. This includes those who are supporting people through their sight loss journey, including parents, partners, carers and friends.

This site is brought to you by many organisations working together www.sightadvicefaq.org.uk.

Type your question into the search box or use the menu to find what you’re looking for.

Content provided by RNIB.

We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:26:48 GMT
Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:04:51 GMT

Who you can talk to

There are many organisations that provide free telephone counselling for different eye conditions.

There are many organisations that provide free telephone counselling for different eye conditions. For example, age-related macular degeneration is the largest cause of sight loss, and the Macular Society has a team of professional counsellors who have been trained to listen, to help people talk through their feelings, and to find ways of dealing with them. To contact the Macular Society, call 0300 3030 111 or visit www.macularsociety.org. RNIB offer several options via their Helpline on 0303 123 9999, including peer support groups, advice, practical and emotional support.

You may find it useful to look up your condition on the internet to get the details of other organisations that are able to help you. There are a number of other things that you may find helpful, such as joining a telephone befriending service, or relaxing through yoga, meditation, mood music and audiobooks. If you want more information, contact your local sight loss charity or RNIB’s helpline on 0303 123 9999 or visit www.sightlinedirectory.org.uk. Some people have also found religion or their faith to be beneficial.

Content provided by RNIB.

We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:23:24 GMT
Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 14:41:52 GMT

Talking to other people and finding out what’s in your local area

It may help to talk with friends, family or others around you who are willing to listen. It may also help to talk to people who have had similar experiences and understand what you’re going through.

It may help to talk with friends, family or others around you who are willing to listen. It may also help to talk to people who have had similar experiences and understand what you’re going through.

Your local sight loss charity can put you in touch with other people in your area, and offer support for partners, family members and friends. Visionary is the umbrella organisation for sight loss charities across the country, providing you with details of your local sight loss charity.

Visit www.visionary.org.uk for more information. Visit the Sightline Directory for more information on your local services www.sightlinedirectory.org.uk

You may also find it helpful to find out about the activities that are available for people with sight loss in your area. Local sight loss charities have lots of information, advice and practical solutions for people with sight loss.

Another good place to meet other people with similar experiences is RNIB Connect. You can share your experiences, hear what others are going through, and learn and find solutions to some of the difficulties you’re facing. You can also connect with people, find out about activities and services in your local area, and join telephone groups or chat online to discuss your sight condition, and the way technology can help you to stay independent. For more information, call RNIB’s Helpline on 0303 123 9999 or visit www.rnib.org.uk/connect

RNIB Connect Radio is made by and for people with sight loss. It broadcasts nationally with a variety of shows to suit all tastes. It has lots of information about living with sight loss. You can hear RNIB Connect Radio on Freeview Channel 730, online, or digitally via Radioplayer and Tunein apps.

People who have served in the Armed Forces, including National Service, are eligible for specialist support from Blind Veterans UK. This includes social activities and respite breaks. They also help people to learn new skills and hobbies. For more information, call 0800 389 7979 or visit www.blindveterans.org.uk

Content provided by RNIB.

We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:14:47 GMT
Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:22:09 GMT

Low vision

The vast majority of people who are issued with a CVI (Certificate of Visual Impairment) will retain some sight.

The vast majority of people who are issued with a CVI (Certificate of Visual Impairment) will retain some sight. There is equipment and there are techniques to help you to make the most of the vision that you have.

We strongly recommend that you have a low vision assessment, as there are plenty of things that can be achieved with the right help.

Your low vision service

Your local low vision service can provide support and further information on sight loss. The low vision service will assess and train you to use magnifiers, lighting and low vision equipment. These are available on long term loan from councils/NHS services, including, in some areas, schemes based at local Optometrists or local sight loss charities. Low vision services across the country are delivered by different organisations. For example, they may be based in your local hospital or may be provided by a local sight loss charity. You can ask your Eye Doctor (Ophthalmologist) or the Eye Clinic Liaison Officer about your nearest low vision service.

Content provided by RNIB.

We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:28:36 GMT
Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:05:20 GMT

Content provided by RNIB.

We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

Published on Tue, 09 Feb 2021 14:32:02 GMT
Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:22:16 GMT

Categories
Health

Help that you can expect from your local council

Help that you can expect from your local council

Registering your sight loss

Every council must hold a register of people living in their area who are sight impaired and severely sight impaired.

View more

Finding out your care and support needs

There are different types of support you can receive from your council. They include vision rehabilitation, which helps to ensure that you have the right information, aids, training and skills to adapt to living with sight loss.

View more

Types of support

Find out what types of support you may receive

View more

On-going care and support that you may need

You may also be eligible for longer term support. Your council must carry out a care and support assessment to find out what is important to you.

View more

Equipment that might help you

Your vision rehabilitation assessment should also help to identify the equipment or aids that you need to help you to maintain, or increase, your independence.

View more

Help for those supporting you

Under the Care Act 2014, carers are entitled to an assessment of their own needs to help them to continue to care.

View more

Registering your sight loss

Every council must hold a register of people living in their area who are sight impaired and severely sight impaired.

Every council must hold a register of people living in their area who are sight impaired and severely sight impaired. Your council will receive a copy of your CVI, and should make contact with you within two weeks, to talk to you about registration and the benefits of being registered.

Your council may also have an agreement with another organisation to contact you on their behalf about registration. So don’t worry if it’s someone else that contacts you on your council’s behalf.

At this point your assessment should start. Under the Care Act 2014, your council has a duty to assess what support you may need.

You are entitled to an assessment whether or not you choose to be registered.

Content provided by RNIB.

We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

Published on Mon, 08 Feb 2021 15:45:54 GMT
Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 14:53:19 GMT

Finding out your care and support needs

There are different types of support you can receive from your council. They include vision rehabilitation, which helps to ensure that you have the right information, aids, training and skills to adapt to living with sight loss.

There are different types of support you can receive from your council. They include vision rehabilitation, which helps to ensure that you have the right information, aids, training and skills to adapt to living with sight loss.

You may also be eligible to receive longer term help with daily living, including support in the home and accessing the community.

Your assessment will most likely start with being on the telephone with someone in a specialist sensory loss team, or in a telephone contact centre. They have the right skills and knowledge to help you, and you will be asked about your needs and what it is you want to achieve. They may also provide you with information and advice, although many councils are placing information and advice online including self-assessment facilities.

The next step may include someone coming to your home.

Where a Local Authority identify disability equipment as promoting independence, this should be provided free of charge up to a value of £1000, regardless of individual financial circumstances. The duty is on the council to arrange an assessment in a timely manner if there is appearance of need.

How vision rehabilitation support can help you

Vision rehabilitation is support that your council must provide to help you to be as independent as possible. Your council should not charge you for this and should make it available for as long as you need it. You also don’t have to be registered to receive vision rehabilitation support.

Content provided by RNIB.

We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

Published on Mon, 08 Feb 2021 16:01:35 GMT
Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 14:58:40 GMT

Types of support

Find out what types of support you may receive

Types of support you may receive include:

  • Understanding your eye condition, learning what it means for you and your family, and explaining the certification and registration process.
  • Coming to terms with your condition and understanding the changes and adjustments you may need to live your life.
  • Looking after yourself and learning new ways of completing tasks.
  • Moving around your home safely and looking after it. This includes assessing your mobility needs, for example, measures to reduce the risks of falls, the use of stairs, and advice on appropriate equipment and mobility aids. If needed, a time can be arranged for you to receive one to one training.
  • Assessing your needs for daily living skills training, for example, any support or training you need to prepare meals, make drinks, use the oven and hob, iron or shop.
  • If needed, referring you to a low vision service, where someone will assess your needs and recommend the use of aids such as magnifiers, and specialist lighting.
  • Reviewing the lighting in your home to see if any improvements can be made.
  • Signposting you for advice and support about your housing needs.
  • Getting out and about, travelling confidently and safely, and using public transport.
  • You may be referred for a benefits check, for example, with regard to claiming Personal Independence Payments or Attendance Allowance, and concessions such as blue badge and travel passes.
  • Looking at your communication needs and how you keep in touch with others, such as reading, writing, telling the time, and using smartphones, tablets and speech software.
  • Ensuring you have access to training, education and learning opportunities.
  • Signposting you to a Disability Employment Advisor or ways to volunteer.
  • Providing information on social activities that match your interests, for example, community groups and local sight loss charities.
  • Providing information on talking books and newspapers.
  • Looking at your emotional needs, for example, counselling, telephone support, peer support, courses or groups.
  • Putting you in contact with other parts of your council, the local low vision service and other organisations in the local community where you can get help.

You should also be given the contact details of the vision rehabilitation service, in case you need to reach them in the future to answer any questions, or if your needs have changed. If you feel that you aren’t ready to engage with the vision rehabilitation service yet, then you can always get in touch at a later time.

“Initially, my confidence took a massive dent, but something that really helped me was participating in a ‘Living with Sight Loss’ course run by my local sight loss charity. I found it incredibly beneficial. I met other people who were in a similar situation to me and together, we shared hints, tips and stories. It made me realise that I was not on my own and it really helped me to re‑build my confidence. My group still meets up regularly and we continue to support each other.” – Steve

Content provided by RNIB.

We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

Published on Mon, 08 Feb 2021 16:09:23 GMT
Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:03:32 GMT

On-going care and support that you may need

You may also be eligible for longer term support. Your council must carry out a care and support assessment to find out what is important to you.

You may also be eligible for longer term support. Your council must carry out a care and support assessment to find out what is important to you. The government has set minimum criteria that people must meet in order to qualify for ongoing care and support.

Someone may come to your home to carry out the assessment, you may be asked to complete a form through a council website or someone might speak to you on the telephone. You can request that someone visits you at home.

Your council will be looking for three things when carrying out an assessment. Firstly, that you have a disability; secondly that you need support to meet two or more out of a list of outcomes; and thirdly, that there is a significant impact on your wellbeing.

The assessed outcomes cover a range of areas, including your ability to move around your home safely, such as using kitchen facilities. Other outcomes include maintaining a habitable and safe home, preparing food, developing and maintaining family or other relationships, and accessing and engaging in work, training, education or volunteering.

If you have already received vision rehabilitation support, but think that your needs are not being met and require some more help, then you can also ask your council for a care and support needs assessment.

If you are eligible for support your council will talk to you about how your eligible needs could be met, this may include talking to you about what informal support networks you have that could meet some of your needs. Dependent on the outcome of this discussion your council may provide you with care and support, or the funding to arrange it yourself (this is called a Direct Payment). Depending on your income you may have to pay a contribution towards this. Your contribution will be determined following a financial assessment undertaken by your council.

If your council hasn’t contacted you, and you feel you might be ‘at risk’ without this help, we strongly recommend you contact your council as soon as possible. Your council must carry out an assessment if you ask for one. The council may still be able to support you without you meeting the eligibility criteria if they feel they can reduce, delay or eliminate some of your needs, by providing a time limited service or low vision aids.

If you need more information, contact your local sight loss charity.

Content provided by RNIB.

We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

Published on Mon, 08 Feb 2021 16:24:02 GMT
Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:04:02 GMT

Equipment that might help you

Your vision rehabilitation assessment should also help to identify the equipment or aids that you need to help you to maintain, or increase, your independence.

Your vision rehabilitation assessment should also help to identify the equipment or aids that you need to help you to maintain, or increase, your independence. They include:

  • Aids, such as a liquid level indicator (to help you make a hot drink safely), talking clock or talking scales.
  • Changes to lighting.
  • Mobility aids, such as a white stick or a symbol cane.

I became sight impaired following a stroke and I really lacked confidence about going out on my own. As an ex‑service person I went to one of the Blind Veterans UK centres which really helped me. The Rehabilitation Worker from my council has also been very helpful. They changed the white stick I was using and taught me how to use it walking on the pavements and getting on and off buses, and are helping me to use it at railway stations. This has all helped me to build up my confidence again, make me less dependent upon others and enable me to get out and about by myself. – Garry

Your council should provide the equipment (aids and minor adaptations) that has been identified in your assessment, and you should be supported with how to use the equipment provided. Some charities also provide equipment and, in many areas, work closely with councils. You will also receive advice on where you can buy other items of equipment to make your life easier. You won’t be charged VAT on equipment that you purchase.

Content provided by RNIB.

We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

Published on Mon, 08 Feb 2021 16:19:42 GMT
Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:03:45 GMT

Help for those supporting you

Under the Care Act 2014, carers are entitled to an assessment of their own needs to help them to continue to care.

Under the Care Act 2014, carers are entitled to an assessment of their own needs to help them to continue to care. To ask for an assessment, contact your council. Carers UK support people who care for family or friends, and provides information and advice to carers, such as advice about benefits, work and practical help. For more information, call 0808 808 7777 or visit www.carersuk.org

Content provided by RNIB.

We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

Published on Mon, 08 Feb 2021 16:27:16 GMT
Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:04:14 GMT

Content provided by RNIB.

We’re the Royal National Institute of Blind People (RNIB), one of the UK’s leading sight loss charities and the largest community of blind and partially sighted people.

Published on Mon, 08 Feb 2021 15:01:53 GMT
Modified on Mon, 22 Feb 2021 15:39:21 GMT

Categories
Health

Covid-19 vaccination for people who are Clinically Extremely Vulnerable

Those who have been asked to shield can book their Covid-19 vaccination at a regional site or wait until they are invited by their local GP-led vaccination centre.

Starting from last week, people aged 18 and over who are Clinically Extremely Vulnerable (those who have been asked to shield) may receive a letter from the national Covid-19 vaccination booking service.

Clinically extremely vulnerable individuals are in the 1-4 priority groups currently receiving their vaccination.

If you are in this group – and you haven’t already had the Covid-19 vaccine – you can use the details in the letter to book in at a regional vaccination centre or nominated community pharmacy.

However, you don’t have to take up this option if you don’t want to – you’ll still be invited by your local GP-led vaccination centre soon. You don’t need to contact your GP practice or any other NHS organisation to request the vaccine – we’ll be in touch when it’s your turn.  

In the meantime, you can find a list of local Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about the Covid-19 vaccination programme here.

You can find out more about the Covid-19 vaccine at: www.nhs.uk/covidvaccine.

If you need help with coronavirus symptoms, please visit: www.nhs.uk/coronavirus.

Content provided by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). For more information, please visit www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Published on Mon, 08 Feb 2021 09:39:15 GMT
Modified on Mon, 08 Feb 2021 14:49:52 GMT

Categories
Health

Number of Covid-19 vaccination centres in Liverpool grows


As the NHS continues to roll-out Covid-19 vaccinations for those in the first four priority groups, the number of vaccination centres in Liverpool communities is being expanded to boost access for the city’s most vulnerable people.

With two new sites in Princes Park and Croxteth opening their doors in the last week, there are currently 13 GP-led vaccination sites across the city.

Each of Liverpool’s 85 GP practices is linked to at least one vaccination centre – eligible patients are told which location they need to attend when they are invited to receive their vaccination. All vaccinations are by appointment only; no drop-in vaccinations are available.

The focus of the vaccine programme remains on the initial priority groups – over 80s (followed by over 70s and people who are clinically extremely vulnerable), care home residents, and health and social care staff. So far, more than 75% of those aged over 80 have been vaccinated.

Local GPs are now working with NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) to identify even more sites in key neighbourhood locations, focussing on some of the city’s most deprived communities.

Instead of creating a single mass vaccination centre for the city, the plan is to deliver the same capacity through a bigger network of sites closer to people’s homes.

Dr Fiona Lemmens, a local GP and Chair of NHS Liverpool CCG said: “Our strategy in Liverpool is to make access to vaccination as easy as possible for people, particularly in those communities which we know are being disproportionately affected by Covid-19.

“It’s important to stress that this doesn’t reduce the amount of vaccinations we can deliver, but is about making sure we deliver them in the best way for local people. Using our current model we have already visited all of the city’s 57 older people’s care homes to offer a first dose, and we are on track to offer the vaccine to all people across the first four priority groups by mid-February, as planned.   

“We’ve also looked at Liverpool’s recent experience with Covid-19 mass testing, which told us that a very local approach – rather than focussing on larger centralised locations – would work better for our population.”

A roving vaccination service for Liverpool has recently been established for housebound patients who are unable to attend a vaccination centre for medical reasons. This team will also look at how best to reach people who might not normally access mainstream NHS services, such as the homeless population.

In addition to local GP-led vaccination services, there are a number of regional vaccination centres for use by people across Cheshire and Merseyside, including one in St Helens. People who are eligible, and who haven’t already been vaccinated by their local GP-led vaccination service, will receive letters from the NHS Covid-19 Vaccination Booking Service, telling them how they can book their appointment at one of these regional centres. There are also plans to extend this service through a number of community pharmacies shortly too.

Those who receive an invitation letter from NHS Covid-19 Vaccination Booking Service do not have to take up this option if they don’t want to, and will still be contacted by the GP-led vaccination centres closer to home when it’s their turn.

The local GP-led vaccination centres and regional vaccination centres are in addition to hospital hub sites, run by NHS trusts, which are focused on vaccinating the local health and social care workforce.

 

Content provided by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). For more information, please visit www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Published on Tue, 02 Feb 2021 10:19:18 GMT
Modified on Tue, 02 Feb 2021 10:19:18 GMT