Categories
Health

Know your diabetes risk – Diabetes Week 2021


During Diabetes Week 2021 (14 – 20 June), the local NHS is encouraging anyone who may be at risk of developing type 2 diabetes in Liverpool to access free NHS advice and support.

In Liverpool alone, more than 16,000 people are currently at risk of developing type 2 diabetes, which can also lead on to a range of further health complications such as strokes, heart disease, limb amputation, and early death.

But the good news is that the risk of Type 2 diabetes can also be reduced through simple, everyday lifestyle changes.

You can check your own risk of developing Type 2 diabetes now by using this simple Online Risk Assessment tool.

If the results indicate that you are at a high risk of developing diabetes, you should ask your GP for a blood test to check your status and refer you to the Healthier You programme.

As part of NHS England’s National Diabetes Prevention Programme (NDPP), Healthier You is a nine-month support programme being delivered in group settings (with online options available during Covid19).

It’s designed to prevent or delay the onset of Type 2 through a range of personalised lifestyle interventions such as better weight management, regular physical activity and healthy diet changes. 

Over the past 2 years, more than 2000 patients have already successfully been through this diabetes prevention programme in Liverpool. One of them is Avril Swan, an NHS worker from Liverpool.

She explains: “I was first diagnosed as being pre-diabetic about 2 years ago. My mother had Type 2 diabetes, so I thought it was pretty much inevitable that I would eventually develop it too.”

“As the beginning of the course, we were asked to set our own targets, according to what we felt we could achieve. The planning tool helped me to think through how I would overcome any obstacles, stay motivated, and get support from people around me. It was very practical and manageable, with lots of encouragement from the group.”

Over the duration of the 9 month course, Avril lost about 36 pounds, her Body Mass Index (BMI) dropped by 6 points, and her cholesterol dropped from 6.3 to 5.2. But the most important change of all was in her blood tests which showed that by the end of the course she was no longer pre-diabetic.

She continues, “Since doing the course, I have become much less sedentary, but I still go nowhere near a gym! Instead, I have found lots of little ways to keep active during my day with regular breaks from sitting at work and my dog also has me on a strict regime of regular brisk walks too.”

She adds, “This turnaround in my health was such a huge relief! I feel delighted that over the 9 months I managed to achieve exactly what I set out to do. I’ve come such a long way through this programme and feel so much healthier and more positive about the future now. It may sound corny, but if I can do it – then so can anyone else!”

Throughout Diabetes Week 2021, people from across the UK are being invited to tell their #DiabetesStories just like Avril. You can find more out about the campaign here: www.diabetes.org.uk/diabetes-week.

You can also find out more about the Healthier You – National Diabetes Prevention Programme here.

Content provided by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). For more information, please visit www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Published on Wed, 16 Jun 2021 11:59:49 GMT
Modified on Wed, 16 Jun 2021 12:00:18 GMT

Categories
Health

Long Covid sufferer from Liverpool urges young people to get the vaccine


With the vaccine rollout in England now opened to those aged 25 and over, young frontline health workers have joined forces to make the facts clearer for young people and urge them to both get the vaccine when their turn comes and get tested regularly, even if they have no symptoms.

Long Covid sufferer Sally McCreith, Head of Medical Education at Liverpool University Hospitals, has shared her own personal experience of the disease and the devastating impact it continues to have on her life. 

The 31-year-old from Liverpool contracted COVID-19 in September 2020. Despite suffering from no underlying health conditions prior to contracting the virus, she is still experiencing debilitating symptoms eight months on and wants to warn people about the impact the virus can have on lives.

She said: “Covid was one of the worst experiences of my life, but what came next was even worse. The virus started with a really horrendous headache, then the tiredness and exhaustion kicked in and I literally couldn’t get out of bed. My husband and I both had a really chesty cough – the noise was terrible, it sounded like our lungs were crackling and I had a constant burning sensation in my chest. We also both completely lost our sense of smell.

“As we started to recover, my husband’s sense of smell came back, but when mine started to return, it wasn’t right. I had developed parosmia, which meant all smells were horribly distorted. I can constantly smell a combination of rotten meat with an underlying chemical smell to it.

“As a result my taste is affected. I used to be a real foodie, but now eating is so difficult, as everything has this vile smell to it. I’ve lost two stone in weight since September, as I have to be very restrictive in what I can eat to avoid being nauseous.

“I’ve also suffered brain fog, which is horrendous. I constantly lose my train of thought and my short term memory is completely gone. I’ll forget the word that I was going to say or worry I’ve left something on or unlocked. Most recently I’ve become really breathless. I can’t even carry the washing up the stairs.

“I never thought this could happen to me, but my whole life has been turned upside down. I want to remind people to be careful and protect themselves. All my friends are racing to get the vaccine after seeing the impact COVID-19 has had on me. It’s the right thing to do, it’s the only way we’re going to get back to some resemblance of normality and it will stop anyone having to go through what I am continuing to have to deal with daily”. 

The COVID-19 vaccine is now available to anyone aged 25or over, or if their 25th birthday falls before 1st July. If you’re eligible, book your vaccination now at: www.nhs.uk/covid-vaccinaton or by calling 119. People are also encouraged to take part in regular COVID-19 testing – find out more at: www.nhs.uk/get-tested.

Sally’s story has been shared as part of the ‘Spread the Facts’ campaign, which features young people working across the healthcare community in Cheshire and Merseyside sharing their experiences of working throughout the pandemic. Visit www.spreadthefacts.co.uk to learn more.

Content provided by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). For more information, please visit www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Published on Thu, 03 Jun 2021 14:20:22 GMT
Modified on Tue, 08 Jun 2021 13:50:21 GMT

Categories
Health

Make NHS 111 your first call for urgent care

The local NHS is reminding people to contact NHS 111 first if they need urgent care over the coming Bank Holiday weekend, when GP practices will be closed.

NHS 111 is staffed by a team of trained professionals and clinicians who will provide over the phone triage, and can book face to face appointment slots at a local NHS Walk-in Centre, out of hours GP practice, or hospital A&E department if required.

By calling NHS 111 patients will get the treatment they need quickly, but will also be safely socially distanced while they wait to be seen.

However, people should still dial 999 as normal in a medical emergency, when someone is seriously injured, their life is at risk, or they could be having a heart attack or stroke – every second counts with these conditions.

People can also book an appointment at a local NHS Walk-in Centre between 8am–8pm daily, by calling 0300 100 1004 to arrange an appointment.

Some local pharmacies will also continue to be open over the bank holidays, and can provide advice on treating lots of minor ailments and injuries. Please click here to check your local branch’s bank holiday opening times.

To access NHS 111, go to 111.nhs.uk or dial 111 at any time – it operates 24 hours a day, every day.

BSL users can use the NHS 111 video interpreter service by going to www.interpreternow.co.uk/nhs111.

Content provided by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). For more information, please visit www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Published on Fri, 28 May 2021 11:14:48 GMT
Modified on Fri, 28 May 2021 11:17:38 GMT

Categories
Health

NHS reminds people to get their second Covid-19 jab

The NHS in Liverpool is stressing the importance of getting a second dose of the Covid-19 vaccine.

The first dose of the vaccine gives good protection from Covid-19 after around three or four weeks, but the second dose is needed for longer lasting protection.

Although the majority of people return for their second dose as planned, records show that a number are still outstanding locally, leaving individuals without the full benefits of vaccination.

Health leaders are calling on people to keep their second dose appointment, and making it clear that it’s not too late to get a second dose if you’ve now gone more than 12 weeks since the first.  

Until recently, people had been invited to receive their second Covid-19 vaccine dose between 11 and 12 weeks after the first. However, the government has now announced plans to reduce this to around eight weeks for over 50s and others at higher risk from Covid-19. If you think you’re in this group, please wait to be contacted about your appointment.

People who booked their vaccination via the national booking service website or 119 make an appointment for both doses at the same time, while those who visited a GP-led vaccination site are invited back when their second dose is due.

Anyone who has now gone over 12 weeks (84 days) since their first dose and has yet to receive an appointment for their second dose should contact their GP in the first instance.

For more information about the vaccination programme in Liverpool, please visit: www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Content provided by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). For more information, please visit www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Published on Wed, 19 May 2021 10:08:54 GMT
Modified on Wed, 19 May 2021 10:08:54 GMT

Categories
Health

Proof of COVID-19 vaccination

Details on how to obtain proof of your COVID-19 vaccination status to show that you’ve had the full course of the COVID-19 vaccine and access this status when travelling abroad.

Demonstrating your COVID-19 vaccination status allows you to show others that you’ve had a full course of the COVID-19 vaccine. A full course is currently 2 doses of any approved vaccine.

COVID-19 vaccination status is available to people who live in England and are registered with a GP, or have an NHS number.

You can get your vaccination status in digital or paper format. The NHS appointment card from vaccination centres cannot be used to demonstrate your vaccine status.

You can show your COVID-19 vaccination status as proof of your status when travelling abroad. You should not be asked to prove it for any other reason (for example by an employer or a venue).

You may still be required to show other proof like a negative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test, and you may still have to isolate on arrival. Please check the entry requirements for your destination country on the GOV.UK foreign travel advice pages.

If you have not been fully vaccinated, you should continue to follow the entry requirements of the country you are travelling to, such as proof of a negative COVID-19 test on arrival. You should carefully research the requirements of your destination country before travelling.

 

How to access your COVID-19 vaccination status

You can access your COVID-19 vaccination status through the free NHS App for Android and iOS. You can access the app through mobile devices such as a smartphone or tablet. Proof of your COVID-19 vaccination status will be shown within the NHS App. Please register with the app before booking international travel. You do not need to contact your GP to access the NHS App.

If you do not have access to a smartphone and know that the country you are travelling to requires COVID-19 vaccination status, you can call 119 and ask for a letter to be posted to you.

Request a letter only if you:

  • have been fully vaccinated by the NHS in England (you should wait 5 working days after your second dose)
  • are planning to travel in the next 4 weeks to a country that requires evidence of COVID-19 vaccination
  • cannot access the digital service via the NHS App

The letter may take up to 7 working days to reach you.

Do not contact your GP surgery about your COVID-19 vaccination status. GPs cannot provide letters showing your COVID-19 vaccination status.

For more information about proof of COVID-19 vaccination, visit GOV.UK.

Content provided by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). For more information, please visit www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Published on Mon, 17 May 2021 14:40:31 GMT
Modified on Mon, 17 May 2021 14:40:31 GMT

Categories
Health

Dementia Action Week

PEOPLE affected by dementia have been hit hardest by Covid. Across Liverpool City Region, Dementia Action Week aims to spread awareness and provide support, advice and …some fun.

From 17th to 23rd May an impressive range of mainly online activities will be taking place throughout the Region – Halton, Knowsley, Liverpool, St Helens, Sefton and Wirral – part of Alzheimer’s Society’s national campaign which also focusses on “curing the care system”.

Local dementia organisations, Councils, businesses and others are offering free public events via Facebook, Zoom and other digital platforms. Sessions will provide information about the condition and how to find help, family carer forums, music and fitness opportunities, talks on research and legal rights, special items on Young Onset dementia and more.

Jack Coutts, chair of Liverpool City Region Dementia Advisory Group said “For the first time the 6 Councils are collaborating in promoting the Week and this is a big step towards making the Region a truly Dementia Friendly Community.

There is something happening for everyone with any interest in dementia and we hope people will drop into the sessions to learn, get support and to enjoy.”

Over 18,000 people in Liverpool City Region are living with dementia which has been the main underlying condition for Covid-19 mortality, accounting for one in five of total deaths. Increased isolation and disruption to key services have also impacted more heavily on people with the condition than any other group.

Alzheimer’s Society said “Liverpool City Region’s plans for Dementia Action Week are looking fantastic!”

Full details of events and registration links can be found at Facebook.com/dementiaLCR or at www.daw21.dementiaactionliverpool.com.

Liverpool City Region Dementia Advisory Group is the body authorised to steer the LCR Combined Authority’s drive to promote dementia friendly policies and initiatives.

Further information can be obtained by contacting Jack Coutts via email: [email protected], or telephone: 0773329417

Content provided by Dementia Action Liverpool (DAL).

Dementia Action Liverpool (DAL) is a place for anyone with an interest in dementia to find out what is provided in and around Liverpool and to help organisations spread the word about their work.

Published on Wed, 05 May 2021 11:57:51 GMT
Modified on Mon, 10 May 2021 16:54:04 GMT

Categories
Health

More self-bookable vaccination sites now available in Liverpool


The local NHS has made it easier for people in Liverpool to book their own Covid-19 vaccination appointments, with an expanded list of local venues now appearing on the national NHS booking system.

All eligible patients in Liverpool can now book an appointment for their first dose at a much wider range of vaccination sites across Liverpool – either online at: www.nhs.uk/covid-vaccination or by calling 119 free of charge between 7am-11pm, seven days a week.

In addition, those who are eligible for the vaccine can also choose to book an appointment at Aintree University Hospital – which isn’t listed in the national system – via the following link: https://aintreeuniversityhospital.nhsbookings.com/v2/#book/service/7/count/1/provider/any/.

People in each of the following categories are currently eligible for a vaccination, and should make an appointment for their first dose now, if they haven’t yet done so:

  • People aged 40 and over
  • People who are clinically extremely vulnerable (asked to shield)
  • People aged 16–39 with an underlying condition that puts them at greater risk from Covid-19
  • Unpaid carers
  • People with a Learning Disability 
  • People who are immuno-supressed (and their household members)
  • Health and social care staff

However, people are asked not to make multiple appointments at different sites, and to cancel any appointments that they can no longer attend so that the slot can be used by someone else.

A second dose of the Covid-19 vaccine should be given between 11 to 12 weeks after the first.

People who booked their first appointment through the national NHS booking system can use the service to book an appointment for their second dose now, if they haven’t yet done so.

Those who received a first dose through a local GP-led site will be contacted around a week and a half before their second dose is due and invited to make an appointment. This is to ensure that everyone receives a second dose of the same type of vaccine.

Anyone who is clinically extremely vulnerable and needs help getting to a local vaccination centre for either dose, can call the Liverpool City Council COVID Advice Line (Freephone) on 0800 169 3032 for extra support, such as a free taxi.

For more information about the Covid-19 vaccination programme in Liverpool, including Frequently Asked Questions, visit: www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Content provided by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). For more information, please visit www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Published on Tue, 04 May 2021 16:13:54 GMT
Modified on Tue, 04 May 2021 16:13:54 GMT

Categories
Health

Contact NHS 111 if you need urgent care over May Bank Holiday weekend


The local NHS is reminding people that they can still access urgent care over the Bank Holiday weekend at any time – including on Bank Holiday Monday (3 May) when GP practices will be closed.

Patients needing a face to face appointment with a health professional are being asked to contact NHS 111 first, who will help direct people to the most appropriate service for treatment.

NHS 111 is staffed by a team of trained professionals and clinicians who will provide instant over the phone triage, and can offer pre-booked face to face appointment slots at an NHS Walk-in Centre, an out of hours GP practice, or a local hospital A&E department if required.

This system is in place to help ensure patients get the care they need as quickly and easily as possible, and will also safely socially distanced while they wait to be seen.

However, people should still dial 999 as normal in a medical emergency, when someone is seriously injured, their life is at risk, or they could be having a heart attack or stroke – every second counts with these conditions.

People should not turn at one of the city’s hospital A&E departments without an appointment unless it really is a life-threatening emergency as they get extremely busy over bank holidays. Instead, contact NHS 111 first, as this really is the best way to get seen quickly and to get the help that you need.

People are also reminded that they can access an appointment at a local NHS Walk-in Centre which continue to operate daily between 8am–8pm, by calling 0300 100 1004 to arrange an appointment directly.

Some local pharmacies will also continue to be open over the bank holidays, but some will operate with reduced hours. Please click here to view a list of opening times for pharmacies in Liverpool.

To access NHS 111, go to 111.nhs.uk or dial 111 at any time – it operates 24 hours a day, every day.

BSL users can use the NHS 111 video interpreter service by going to www.interpreternow.co.uk/nhs111.


Content provided by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). For more information, please visit www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Published on Fri, 30 Apr 2021 13:31:16 GMT
Modified on Fri, 30 Apr 2021 13:31:37 GMT

Categories
Health

eConsult Self-help & Pharmacy advice

Get advice on how to look after yourself and your condition using eConsult.

As well as allowing you to submit your symptoms or requests to your GP electronically, eConsult also offers around the clock NHS self-help information, signposting to services, and a symptom checker.

You can use eConsult for self-help from any device that has an internet connection – and at any time that is convenient to you.

To access the self-help information, follow the below steps:

  • Click on the eConsult banner or button on our website.
  • Click on ‘I want help for my condition’ and find your condition.
  • Select ‘I want to help myself’ or ‘I want Pharmacy advice’.

‘I want to help myself’.

This option gives you trusted information how to look after yourself and your condition.  It provides access NHS information on hundreds of conditions and how to treat them online.

‘I want Pharmacy advice’.

This option provides information about over-the-counter-treatments. It also helps you to find your nearest Pharmacy which may provide treatment for your problem.

NHS App

Patients can also now use the official NHS App to access self-help advice. Find out more about the NHS App here or you can download it for free from any app store now.


Content provided by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). For more information, please visit www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Published on Thu, 29 Apr 2021 12:09:49 GMT
Modified on Thu, 29 Apr 2021 12:16:04 GMT

Categories
Health

Choose NHS 111 first over Easter

 

If you need urgent NHS care over the Easter weekend, contact the NHS 111 service, especially on Friday 2 April (Good Friday) and Monday 5 April (Easter Monday) when GP practices will be closed.

NHS 111 is staffed by a team of trained professionals and clinicians who will direct people to the most appropriate health service.

This could include an NHS walk-in centre, a GP practice offering out of hours support, a pharmacy, or a local hospital.

If patients are assessed as needing to attend a hospital Emergency Department or NHS Walk-in Centre, they will be given a booked time slot to be seen to help manage demand and ensure patients are safely socially distanced while they wait.

However people should still dial 999 as normal in a medical emergency, such as when someone is seriously injured, their life is at risk, or they could be having a heart attack or stroke – every second counts with these conditions.

Please be aware that whilst many local pharmacies are still open over Easter, some will be closed and many will be operating with different opening times to normal.

For the full list of Easter opening times for pharmacies in Liverpool, please click here or contact NHS 111 for further advice on your nearest open branch.

Please also remember that access to local NHS walk-in centres continues to be by telephone triage and pre-booked appointments only during Covid-19 – contact NHS 111 or call 0300 100 1004 to access this service.

To access NHS 111, go to 111.nhs.uk or dial 111 at any time – it operates 24 hours a day, every day.

BSL users can use the NHS 111 video interpreter service by going to www.interpreternow.co.uk/nhs111.

Content provided by NHS Liverpool Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG). For more information, please visit www.liverpoolccg.nhs.uk.

Published on Thu, 01 Apr 2021 14:22:47 GMT
Modified on Thu, 01 Apr 2021 14:22:47 GMT